Blowin’ on the Winds: Sue Heineman and Paul Cigan at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, February 27, 2012

On Monday, the University of Maryland School of Music presented a wind faculty concert featuring bassoonist/Artist-in-Residence Sue Heineman and faculty member/clarinetist Paul Cigan, whose day jobs are with the National Symphony, accompanied by redoubtable pianist Audrey Andrist in the Gildenhorn Recital Hall of the university’s Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center for the price of zero dollars. A free concert in which high-caliber symphonic instrumentalists play solo in a cozy space? That recommends itself. This year’s edition of this long-running series, while not quite my favorite, had enough novel repertoire and delectable playing to make it well worthy anyone’s time.

Sue Heineman, from the U-Md website

Heineman and Cigan split duties right down the middle, with each taking two solo turns and joining forces in two works. Cigan had my favorite new discovery of the evening, Witold Lutoslawski’s five “Dance Preludes” for clarinet and piano. The odd-numbered preludes all sprang forward at near-breathless tempi; Cigan and Andrist handled them with style, enjoying Lutoslawski’s decisive rhythms and witty turns of phrase, including some deliciously witty endings. The even-numbered preludes proceeded at slower tempi and in a more serious mien. Here, Cigan reveled in the coloristic opportunities and phrased his melodies sensitively, while he and Andrist continued to convey the dance pulse beneath it all. The fourth prelude in particular had a haunting intensity, a poised melody with a heartbeat of a rhythm beneath.

Cigan also got to show his timbral chops in the third movement of Olivier Messiaen’s well-known Quartet for the End of Time, “Abime des oiseaux” (“Abyss of the Birds”), in which he made his solo clarinet sing, twitter, echo, and softly swoon as necessary.

Paul Cigan, from the U-Md website

Cigan’s repertoire demanded the full capacities of the clarinet, and he responded; by contrast, Heineman played transcriptions of violin works, putting her own reedy stamp on them. She sounded most idiomatic in Sergei Prokofiev’s second violin sonata (in D, op. 94), playing with the various colors of the instrument as it moves up and down in pitch, stentorian low notes and creamy middles contrasting with astringent highs. Her phrasing, too, sounded entirely bassoonish, with scales well articulated and capped with a little extra breath; I missed the violin only in the fastest runs, which didn’t sound quite as fluent when keyed. My concertgoing companion, who didn’t know the original, could barely believe the sonata had been written for the violin. (And of course, as EvB points out below, it had not been; it was written for the flute. I knew this somewhere in my brain and am embarrassed that this error made it to the blog. My apologies. The preceding was an accurate representation of my thoughts as I listened to the performance, since I didn’t think of that info during the concert either.) Andrist had the full measure of Prokofiev’s spiky accompaniment as well.

A combo of two pieces by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart for violin and orchestra (Adagio in E Major, K. 261, and Rondo in C Major, K. 373), demanded less in terms of extremes of expression and pitch, and while Heineman and Andrist played with Mozartean style and balance, here I did miss the sweetness and brightness of the violin.

Audrey Andrist, from her website. Photo by Stan Barouh

The only work on the whole program actually written for the bassoon was Mikhail Glinka’s “Trio pathetique” for clarinet, bassoon, and piano, and the only problem with Glinka’s trio is that it is terrible, a mix of thundering Romantic gestures that didn’t cohere into themes, much less structures. Although Heineman had to play the role of the cello in American composer Robert Muczynski’s Fantasy Trio, it provided a lot more to savor, with rhythmically pointed yet lyrical themes that stuck in my head, particularly a questing, decisive theme in the finale that sounded like it belonged in some higher-quality “Indiana Jones” sequel. Cigan, Heineman, and Andrist played like they were enjoying the adventure.

The disappointing Glinka ended the concert, the last in a series of minor concert-presentation missteps, most prominent of which was a program that listed the works out of order, without any kind of descriptive notes. The latter would have been fine except that, even in the very relaxed concert atmosphere, Heineman and Cigan didn’t talk at all about the works. A few words from Heineman on why she selected these transcriptions in particular would have been welcome, for example. Still, a lot to enjoy, especially the Lutoslawski and Muczynski. I’ll keep a look out for next year’s show, and if you like excellent free shows, you should do the same.

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3 Comments on “Blowin’ on the Winds: Sue Heineman and Paul Cigan at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, February 27, 2012”

  1. Evb Says:

    FYI, Prokofiev’s Violin Sonata No. 2 was originally written for the flute: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violin_Sonata_No._2_(Prokofiev).

    • Andrew Lindemann Malone Says:

      Thanks. I knew that somewhere in my brain, and it’s embarrassing that the info did not make it out of my brain and into the blog. I have amended the review above.


  2. […] principal bassoon, playing a concerto, and you know I like her playing based on this, this, and this. And the other is Leila Josefowicz playing John Adams’ violin concerto, which I liked a ton […]


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